Posted by: John Colby | Monday August 25 2008

It’s the little things

It’s the little things that we found in Cornwall that somehow make a difference. They’re mostly small and wouldn’t normally be noticed so we’ve collected them just, in a way, to be different.

A monument in Paul Church – but who was he?

"His merit being sufficiently known, he needs no further description." This inscription on this monument in Paul Church intrigues, but who was he and what did he do?

His merit being sufficiently known, he needs no further description is the inscription on this monument to a commander killed whilst fighting French pirates. But who was he and what did he do?

An eighteenth century “oops!”

You can imagine the language of the carver when his carefully worked out letter spacing didn't quite fit at the end of the inscription. This example for St Buryan Church.

You can imagine the language of the carver when his carefully worked out letter spacing didn't quite fit at the end of the inscription. This little thing from St Buryan Church.

It’s the people who make the atmosphere

When you get to The Dry (the miners' changing area) at Geevor mine the atmosphere changes. You move from looking at things alone, the equipment of mining, to looking at people's things, people with names, people whose photographs adorn the walls. Visitors subtly change in their behaviour, the kids become quieter, more interested. The photographs of course, help. Many of them are named so it becomes that much more personal. It becomes so much more part of 'us' than just a faceless, remote museum. We think they've got it just right.

When you get to The Dry (the miners' changing area) at Geevor mine the atmosphere changes. You move from looking at things alone, the equipment of mining, to looking at people's things, people with names, people whose photographs adorn the walls. Visitors subtly change in their behaviour, the kids become quieter, more interested. The photographs of course, help. Many of them are named so it becomes that much more personal. It becomes so much more part of 'us' than just a faceless, remote museum. We think they've got it just right.

Millennium sundials

Millennium sundials are, well, sundials made or restored to commemmorate the millennium. At Gulval students from Penwith College were involved.

Millennium sundials are, well, sundials made or restored to commemorate the millennium. At Gulval students from Penwith College were involved.

More than a century of service

Mobility of population is more of a modern phenomenon. It is salutory to remember that less than a century ago the vast majority of people were born, lived and died within a few miles. These plaques in Morvah churh commemorate three successive organists whose total service stretches for 107 years.

Mobility of population is more of a modern phenomenon. It is salutary to remember that less than a century ago the vast majority of people were born, lived and died within a few miles. These plaques in Morvah church commemorate three successive organists whose total service stretches for 107 years.

Swallows are damn’ quick fliers!

Swallows nest in dark nooks and crannies and need a supply of insects to feed their brood. Church porches are almost ideal and the majority of churches encourage their visits. Waiting in hurch porches for the visit of the parents makes you realise just how fast they fly. At St Keverne all we managed to get was a shot of the tail.

Swallows nest in dark nooks and crannies and need a supply of insects to feed their brood. Church porches are almost ideal and the majority of churches encourage their visits. Waiting in church porches for the visit of the parents makes you realise just how fast they fly. At St Keverne all we managed to get was a shot of the tail.

At Towednack they look after their visitors with care.

At Towednack they look after their visitors with care.

And finally at St Uny (Lelant) one finally stood on the edge of the next while the camera was ready. It makes you realise just what patience wildlife photographers must have.

And finally at St Uny (Lelant) one finally stood on the edge of the next while the camera was ready. It makes you realise just what patience wildlife photographers must have.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

WordPress.com

WordPress.com is the best place for your personal blog or business site.

%d bloggers like this: